Tag Archives: study

Mindhunter Review: An Appealingly Repulsing Serial Killer Study

CBS’s long-running procedural Criminal Minds chronicles the grim exploits of the F.B.I.’s Behavioral Analysis Unit, giving us a gruesome murder a week (well, it’s usually a murder—and sometimes it’s not just one) as highly skilled agents craft a psychological profile of the unknown subject—an “unsub”—to crack the case. The show, being a CBS procedural, is often witless and goofy, unrelentingly dark as it is. (The writing team has to come up with more and more elaborate ways for a person to die with each new episode—a pile of bodies now stacked up 13 seasons high.) A lot of its whizzing technical talk—the credulous way these profilers rely on what seem like a lot of broad inferences and guesswork—gives Criminal Minds a strong whiff of make-believe. Wouldn’t it be nice if these techniques were applicable in real-world crime-solving?

Actually, they kind of are. Clunky as Criminal Minds may be, it is based,

Read more at: https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2017/10/mindhunter-netflix-review

Researchers Forced To Scrap Another Sleep Study After Participants Murdered In Dreams By Serial Killer

STANFORD, CA—Having no choice but to discard the partial and unusable results, researchers at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine were forced on Thursday to scrap yet another sleep study after participants were murdered in their dreams by a serial killer. “Unfortunately, after our sleeping subjects were once again massacred by a phantasmagorical serial killer, all of our data were rendered worthless,” said lead researcher Gregory Thompson, saying that the wildly fluctuating vital signs of the sleeping test subjects seemed to suggest that they had been swallowed by their beds and had their bones spit out in geysers of blood. “We have attempted to fine-tune our test conditions several times since this problem first arose in the 1980s, but to no avail. Despite our best efforts, every batch of participants has either been hacked to pieces by what almost seems like invisible knifes, or they writhe as if

Read more at: http://www.theonion.com/article/researchers-forced-scrap-another-sleep-study-after-57187

Spirituality is still seen as a safeguard against extreme immoral acts, study shows

Posted

August 08, 2017 15:14:21

An elderly woman holds rosary beads.
Photo:

Jane Caro says it’s hard to comprehend how religion continues to be so closely attached to morality. (ABC News: Jean Edwards)

Who would you trust more, a person who says they’re religious or someone who identifies as atheist?

The answer it appears, according a study published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, is that even though we live in an age of terrorism

Read more at: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-08/is-a-serial-killer-more-likely-to-be-religious-or-atheist/8784826

The Serial Killer Test: Biases Against Atheists Emerge in Study – The …

One item on the questionnaire began with a description of a sociopath: a man who, having tortured animals when young, later began hurting people and “has killed five homeless people that he abducted from poor neighborhoods in his home city. Their dismembered bodies are currently buried in his basement.” A question followed. Half the participants in each country got one version of the question: “Which is more probable? 1) The man is a teacher; or 2) The man is a teacher and does not believe in any gods.”

The other half got another version: “Which is more probable? 1) The man is a teacher; or 2) The man is a teacher and a religious believer.” The questionnaire also included several brainteasers and other questions to distract from the purpose of the study.

Newsletter Sign Up

Continue reading the main story

Read more at: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/07/health/atheists-religion-study.html

The Serial Killer Test: Biases Against Atheists Emerge in Study

One item on the questionnaire began with a description of a sociopath: a man who, having tortured animals when young, later began hurting people and “has killed five homeless people that he abducted from poor neighborhoods in his home city. Their dismembered bodies are currently buried in his basement.” A question followed. Half the participants in each country got one version of the question: “Which is more probable? 1) The man is a teacher; or 2) The man is a teacher and does not believe in any gods.”

The other half got another version: “Which is more probable? 1) The man is a teacher; or 2) The man is a teacher and a religious believer.” The questionnaire also included several brainteasers and other questions to distract from the purpose of the study.

Newsletter Sign Up

Continue reading the main story

Read more at: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/07/health/atheists-religion-study.html

Study: Bristol County per-inmate cost low, healthcare high

Bristol County Sheriff Thomas Hodgson credits a management accountability program created two decades ago as a key factor in why Bristol County has the lowest average cost per inmate, according to a new statewide study.

But the MassINC report released Monday on correctional expenditures in the state also found that Bristol County was the fourth highest in the state for average healthcare spending in FY 2016, with $7,355 per inmate.

The report found that Bristol County had the lowest total cost per inmate for fiscal year 2016, with an average of $41,013 per inmate. Hodgson currently houses 1,303 inmates for a grand total of $53,439,939. For comparison, Berkshire County had an average cost per inmate of $87,579. 

The sheriff said the Strategic Accountability Management System, or SAMS as Hodgson refers to it, has helped him keep his finger on the pulse of what goes

Read more at: http://www.southcoasttoday.com/news/20170515/study-bristol-county-per-inmate-cost-low-healthcare-high

A Serial-Killer Study

Photo

Jeffrey Dean Morgan in “Texas Killing Fields.”

Credit
Gusmano Cesaretti/Anchor Bay Films

A good thriller earns its suspense by building toward it. “Texas Killing Fields,” a serial-killer study inspired by an actual case, takes its suspense for granted, which leaves it weak where it should be at its most

Read more at: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/14/movies/texas-killing-fields-with-sam-worthington-review.html