Tag Archives: highway

Taunton author of book on New Bedford Highway Serial killer to appear in Raynham

It was almost 30 years ago when the bodies of nine murdered young women were discovered, one after another, buried along highways emanating from New Bedford.

The victims shared a common problem with drug addiction. Some had a history of prostitution. They were vulnerable.

Two other women who shared that profile also went missing during that same period. Their bodies were never recovered.

Maureen Boyle was a New Bedford Standard Times crime beat reporter at the time and was the first to discern that this wasn’t just a missing persons’ case.

Those suspicions were fully realized that November as the body count mounted.

The New Bedford Highway serial killer was never caught – though two suspects emerged from the intense investigation.

Boyle’s new book, “Shallow Graves: The Hunt for the New Bedford Highway Serial Killer,” published by ForeEdge/University Press of New England, chronicles the case from its beginnings.

And the book, her

Read more at: http://www.tauntongazette.com/news/20171122/author-of-book-on-new-bedford-highway-serial-killer-to-appear-in-raynham

Bigger buses coming to meet the demand on Highway of Tears

B.C. Transit says it will be getting bigger buses to meet the demand for public transit along Highway 16 between Prince George and Burns Lake — a service that was added in response to the demand for safe transportation along Highway 16, a road known as “the Highway of Tears.”

The highway, so known because of a series of murders and disappearances of mainly Indigenous women along its 720 kilometres, runs between Prince George and Prince Rupert, B.C.

“We are pleased to see the ridership numbers,” said B.C. Transit spokesperson Jonathan Dyck. 

Since starting in June, Dyck said there has been consistent ridership on its routes between Prince George and Burns Lake, as well as between Burns Lake and Smithers.

Roger Joseph

Roger Joseph is using the new bus service, because his daughter felt it was too dangerous for him to

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bigger-buses-coming-to-meet-the-demand-on-highway-of-tears-1.4369509

Highway of Tears still needs public transit options, locals say

On a recent crisp fall morning, a compact white shuttle bus rolled to a stop just off the Yellowhead Highway. Four people hastily exited and began to walk briskly toward their destinations.

After all, it was 9:38 a.m., giving them just more than five hours in Smithers before the bus departed again at 3 p.m.

One of the passengers was Joe Scheck, 50, who catches the bus from Houston three times a week to do yard work in Smithers. His boss would like him to work full time, but the bus only runs on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

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“If I could, I would do it five times a week,” said Mr. Scheck, standing next to his rusty Jeep bicycle, his only other form of transportation.

Mr. Scheck, as with many residents of small communities along Highway 16 in central British Columbia, can’t afford to live

Read more at: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/highway-of-tears-still-needs-public-transit-options-locals-say/article36455472/

Highway of Tears needs better public transit, community members say

Scheck, like many residents of small communities along Hwy. 16 in central British Columbia, can’t afford to live in Smithers but also can’t find work — or even buy groceries — in his town. If he were able to work five days a week, he estimates he’d take home an extra $400 a month.

The province launched the $5-a-trip bus route from Burns Lake to Smithers in June. It also started a route from Prince George to Burns Lake, which operates Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. A route that connects Smithers and nearby Moricetown has operated since January.

Still, advocates say the service is only a patchwork, and it arrived more than a decade after families and Indigenous advocates called on the government to provide public transportation along a notorious stretch of Hwy. 16 known as the Highway of Tears.

The RCMP says 18 women have gone missing or have been murdered on the

Read more at: https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/10/01/highway-of-tears-needs-more-public-transit-community-members-say.html

Skepticism and hope as national MMIWG hearings come to BC’s Highway of Tears

Gladys Radek has spent a lot of time walking since her niece Tamara Chipman disappeared 12 years ago.

She’s marched across the country to speak in the House of Commons about her niece and other missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

She’s also walked the Highway of Tears, the stretch of Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert, B.C., where Chipman was last seen.

On Monday, Radek completed what she says will be her final walk: a 300-kilometre journey from Prince Rupert to Smithers where she will testify at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

“The first walk that we did was to demand a national inquiry, so now that we have this national inquiry, what we’ll be doing is we’ll be walking into those

Read more at: https://ca.news.yahoo.com/skepticism-hope-national-mmiwg-hearings-090000784.html

Skepticism and hope as national MMIWG hearings come to BC’s Highway of Tears

Gladys Radek has spent a lot of time walking since her niece Tamara Chipman disappeared 12 years ago.

She’s marched across the country to speak in the House of Commons about her niece and other missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

She’s also walked the Highway of Tears, the stretch of Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert, B.C., where Chipman was last seen.

On Monday, Radek completed what she says will be her final walk: a 300-kilometre journey from Prince Rupert to Smithers where she will testify at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Gladys Radek

Gladys Radek holds a photo of her niece Tamara Chipman, who disappeared in 2005 along Highway 16 in northern B.C. The 700-kilometre stretch of highway between Prince George and Prince Rupert has been dubbed the Highway of Tears because of the number of women and

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mmiwg-hearings-smithers-1.4303888

Families walk Highway of Tears before missing, murdered Indigenous women hearing

SMITHERS, B.C. — Gladys Radek raised a fist in the air and wept as she reached the end of her 350-kilometre journey along British Columbia’s Highway of Tears.

The Indigenous grandmother finished her walk along the notorious stretch of Highway 16 for the seventh and final time on Monday. It is the same highway where her beloved niece Tamara Lynn Chipman disappeared.

Outside a community centre in Smithers, B.C., her voice shook as she spoke to those who had walked alongside her, including commissioners from the national inquiry into missing and murdered women.

“I want to thank you all for standing so proud and loud, to show our commissioners that we have love for our missing and murdered women,” she said through tears.

“I’m very proud of this moment right now because when Tamara went missing, nobody cared. When Tamara went missing, there were many others who were already missing, many others who had

Read more at: https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/families-walk-highway-of-tears-before-missing-murdered-indigenous-women-hearing-1.3604354

‘Safe, reliable and affordable’: New bus service aims to make notorious Highway of Tears less dangerous

As a B.C. Transit bus swings open its doors in front of the Pine Centre Mall in Prince George, a small crowd of people carrying duffel bags and backpacks file on.

They each stuff $5 into the fare box to take the three-hour ride from Prince George to Burns Lake, a community to the west along B.C.’s Highway 16, a 720-kilometre remote stretch of road that’s also known as the Highway of Tears.

“They should have put this bus up years ago before people started going missing,” said Roger Joseph, 61, who was seated by a window.

Highway of Tears - 18 missing women

These images are of 18 women and girls whose deaths and disappearances are part of the RCMP’s investigation of the Highway of Tears in British Columbia. The women were either found or last seen near Highway 16 or near Highways 97 and 5. (Individual photos from Highwayoftears.ca)

This bus

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bus-service-bc-highway-of-tears-1.4294249

Families walk Highway of Tears to honour missing, murdered Indigenous women

VANCOUVER — When Gladys Radek walks the Highway of Tears, she says she can feel the spirits of women who are missing or have been murdered walking beside her.

Dozens have vanished or been killed along the notorious stretch of Highway 16 in central British Columbia. On Thursday, Radek will honour the 12th anniversary of the disappearance of her niece, Tamara Lynn Chipman, by walking the route once again.

“You can feel the pain of the families when they’re walking with you,” she said. “It’s really, really hard to describe.”

The annual journey, made by Radek and others who have lost loved ones, will span five days this year and cover 350 kilometres between Prince Rupert and Smithers. Vehicles will accompany the walkers who will cover sections of the route in a relay fashion.

Commissioners of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls are set to join the walk on

Read more at: https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/families-walk-highway-of-tears-to-honour-missing-murdered-indigenous-women-1.3597974

Author of book on New Bedford Highway Serial killer to appear at Wareham Free Library

It was almost 30 years ago when the bodies of nine murdered young women were discovered, one after another, buried along highways emanating from New Bedford.

The victims shared a common problem with drug addiction. Some had a history of prostitution. They were vulnerable.

Two other women who shared that profile also went missing during that same period. Their bodies were never recovered.

Maureen Boyle was a New Bedford Standard Times crime beat reporter at the time and was the first to discern that this wasn’t just a missing persons’ case.

Those suspicions were fully realized that November as the body count mounted.

The New Bedford Highway serial killer was never caught – though two suspects emerged from the intense investigation.

Boyle’s new book, “Shallow Graves: The Hunt for the New Bedford Highway Serial Killer,” published by ForeEdge/University Press of New England, chronicles the case from its beginnings.

And the book, her

Read more at: http://wareham.wickedlocal.com/news/20170919/author-of-book-on-new-bedford-highway-serial-killer-to-appear-at-wareham-free-library