Category Archives: Green River Killer

Data Analytics Takes On Serial Killers (Aspiring Data Scientists: Try This At Home)

A montage of photos of alleged victims is projected on a screen in the courtroom during the during closing arguments in the serial murder trial of Lonnie Franklin Jr., seated at far left, in Los Angeles Superior Court.  (Mark Boster/ Los Angeles Times, Pool, File)

The headlines almost scream of superhuman data analytics:

Yet the motivation and methods behind the Murder Accountability Project are profoundly human.

Thomas Hargrove wants to save lives.

He’s good with data. So, when he discovered the FBI’s Supplementary Homicide Report, a database of details about murders across the country, he saw an opportunity.

“My first thought was, I wonder if I could teach a computer to spot serial

Read more at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/metabrown/2017/12/09/data-analytics-takes-on-serial-killers-aspiring-data-scientists-try-this-at-home/

How Forensic DNA Evidence Can Lead to Wrongful Convictions

Lynette White was murdered in 1988. When the three men first imprisoned for her murder were found to have been wrongfully convicted, it seemed that her killer would go unpunished. However, new technology invented in 2002 was used to analyze DNA found at the scene of the murder. The only match was to a boy too young to have committed the murder, but DNA samples were taken from his family. The youth’s uncle confessed, and was sentenced to life imprisonment in 2003.

In criminal investigation, DNA evidence can be a game-changer. But DNA is just one piece of the puzzle, rarely giving a clear “he did it” answer. According to a consortium of forensic experts who released a report earlier this year, there are limits to what DNA can tell us about a crime. And what it can and can’t reliably prove in court needs to be much clearer.

DNA

Read more at: https://daily.jstor.org/forensic-dna-evidence-can-lead-wrongful-convictions/

How Forensic DNA Evidence Can Lead to Wrongful Convictions …

Lynette White was murdered in 1988. When the three men first imprisoned for her murder were found to have been wrongfully convicted, it seemed that her killer would go unpunished. However, new technology invented in 2002 was used to analyze DNA found at the scene of the murder. The only match was to a boy too young to have committed the murder, but DNA samples were taken from his family. The youth’s uncle confessed, and was sentenced to life imprisonment in 2003.

In criminal investigation, DNA evidence can be a game-changer. But DNA is just one piece of the puzzle, rarely giving a clear “he did it” answer. According to a consortium of forensic experts who released a report earlier this year, there are limits to what DNA can tell us about a crime. And what it can and can’t reliably prove in court needs to be much clearer.

DNA

Read more at: https://daily.jstor.org/forensic-dna-evidence-can-lead-wrongful-convictions/

Police question if 5 missing women are victims of a serial killer

TACOMA (KCPQ)— The discovery of a partial human skull last month in a wooded area in East Pierce County has reignited interest in solving some long-term missing persons cases.

Investigators won’t know if the skull fragment is from a man or a woman until DNA test results are complete.

“Anytime there are human remains found in the state, loved ones of missing persons from around the state and sometimes bordering states will reach out and make sure that we are making that comparison and ruling out or checking on their loved ones,” said Carrie Gordon with the Washington State Patrol’s Missing and Unidentified Persons Unit.

RELATED: Police question if 5 missing women are victims of a serial killer

Read more at: https://www.aol.com/article/news/2017/12/01/police-question-if-5-missing-women-are-victims-of-a-serial-killer/23294654/

‘Mindhunter’ Renewed For A Second Season On Netflix

Missing: Helen Tucker’s mother refuses to give up hope


Helen Tucker (left) and an age projection of Tucker (right).

Helen Tucker (left) and an age projection of Tucker (right).

TACOMA — Helen Tucker was 27-years-old when she went missing in Tacoma on January 20, 1994.

She is one of five women and teens who went missing in the same area between 1994 and 2010 who were working as prostitutes.

Tacoma Police are now asking for the public’s help with any information about who Helen associated with.

“Whatever their lifestyle is, their lives matter. They’re someone’s children,” said Freda Gable, Helen’s mom.

When her daughter was little, they lived in Bonney Lake.

Helen as a child.

“She was such a quiet baby and happy baby. She never cried. She squeaked,” said her mom.

Helen went to school in Sumner,

Read more at: http://q13fox.com/2017/11/30/helen-tucker-mother-of-missing-daughter-in-tacoma-says-she-wants-answers/

John Douglas on ‘Mindhunter’ – Part 2 | Military Press

“Mindhunter,” a bestselling book and now a Netflix original series, takes people behind the scenes of some of the most gruesome and challenging cases. FBI profilers gather up crime scene evidence to help predict the type of personality that commits serial murders. Through interviews with some of the most ghastly killers such as Charles Manson, Edmund Kemper and the Son of Sam, to mention a few, author John Douglas determines their motives, attempting to figure out why they did what they did and why in such a particular manner.

Elise Cooper: The Netflix show has Dr. Wendy Carr as a consultant, was she based on anyone?

John Douglas: She did not exist, but was based upon Dr. Anne Burgess, who is more of an academic type. She came down to meet with another agent that was investigating rape. After she heard about what we were doing, she wanted to learn more about

Read more at: http://www.militarypress.com/john-douglas-on-mindhunter-part-2/

John Douglas on ‘Mindhunter’ – Part 2

“Mindhunter,” a bestselling book and now a Netflix original series, takes people behind the scenes of some of the most gruesome and challenging cases. FBI profilers gather up crime scene evidence to help predict the type of personality that commits serial murders. Through interviews with some of the most ghastly killers such as Charles Manson, Edmund Kemper and the Son of Sam, to mention a few, author John Douglas determines their motives, attempting to figure out why they did what they did and why in such a particular manner.

Elise Cooper: The Netflix show has Dr. Wendy Carr as a consultant, was she based on anyone?

John Douglas: She did not exist, but was based upon Dr. Anne Burgess, who is more of an academic type. She came down to meet with another agent that was investigating rape. After she heard about what we were doing, she wanted to learn more about

Read more at: http://www.militarypress.com/john-douglas-on-mindhunter-part-2/

What Anthony Bourdain Left Out of the Seattle Parts Unknown Episode

Pretending to have fun on Vashon.

There was plenty to hate in the recent Seattle episode of Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. The episode is essentially about the clash between old and new, art and tech, NIMBY and YIMBY, which can be an interesting (if plenty covered) conflict. But the show had some very strange elements. The singalong at the end was particularly cringe-worthy, when producers forced a bunch of unknown-elsewhere and kind-of-known-here locals like John Criscitello and Knute Berger to lip sync, straight-faced, over a Mark Lanegan song. Lanegan, the frontman for the grunge-era band Screaming Trees, was apparently the reason Bourdain, who is a fan,

Read more at: https://www.thestranger.com/slog/2017/11/30/25598439/what-anthony-bourdain-left-out

What Anthony Bourdain Left Out of the Seattle Parts Unknown …

Pretending to have fun on Vashon.

There was plenty to hate in the recent Seattle episode of Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown. The episode is essentially about the clash between old and new, art and tech, NIMBY and YIMBY, which can be an interesting (if plenty covered) conflict. But the show had some very strange elements. The singalong at the end was particularly cringe-worthy, when producers forced a bunch of unknown-elsewhere and kind-of-known-here locals like John Criscitello and Knute Berger to lip sync, straight-faced, over a Mark Lanegan song. Lanegan, the frontman for the grunge-era band Screaming Trees, was apparently the reason Bourdain, who is a fan,

Read more at: https://www.thestranger.com/slog/2017/11/30/25598439/what-anthony-bourdain-left-out