Category Archives: Highway of Tears

Moose Hide Campaign grows to 1 million members for 7th annual event

Thousands of British Columbians will pin small squares of moose hide on their shirt or jacket fronts Thursday as a statement of support for ending violence against Indigenous women.

The pins are part of the Moose Hide Campaign, which holds its seventh annual provincial march and gathering on the grounds of the B.C. Legislature on Thursday. 

The campaign was founded by father and daughter Paul and Raven Lacerte after a moose-hunting trip along the so-called Highway of Tears. They were moved to action by the deaths and disappearances of girls and women along that route.

‘We came up with this idea to tan a moose hide, cut it up into little squares and ask men to wear it,” Raven Lacerte told On the Island host Gregor Craigie.

The Lacertes found the unusual pins sparked questions and opened the door

Read more at: https://ca.news.yahoo.com/moose-hide-campaign-grows-1-184500078.html

Moose Hide Campaign grows to 1 million members for 7th annual event

Thousands of British Columbians will pin small squares of moose hide on their shirt or jacket fronts Thursday as a statement of support for ending violence against Indigenous women.

The pins are part of the Moose Hide Campaign, which holds its seventh annual provincial march and gathering on the grounds of the B.C. Legislature on Thursday. 

The campaign was founded by father and daughter Paul and Raven Lacerte after a moose-hunting trip along the so-called Highway of Tears. They were moved to action by the deaths and disappearances of girls and women along that route.

‘We came up with this idea to tan a moose hide, cut it up into little squares and ask men to wear it,” Raven Lacerte told On the

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/moose-hide-campaign-day-victoria-indigenous-women-violence-1.4536707

Moose Hide Campaign grows to 1 million members for 7th annual …

Thousands of British Columbians will pin small squares of moose hide on their shirt or jacket fronts Thursday as a statement of support for ending violence against Indigenous women.

The pins are part of the Moose Hide Campaign, which holds its seventh annual provincial march and gathering on the grounds of the B.C. Legislature on Thursday. 

The campaign was founded by father and daughter Paul and Raven Lacerte after a moose-hunting trip along the so-called Highway of Tears. They were moved to action by the deaths and disappearances of girls and women along that route.

‘We came up with this idea to tan a moose hide, cut it up into little squares and ask men to wear it,” Raven Lacerte told On the

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/moose-hide-campaign-day-victoria-indigenous-women-violence-1.4536707

No More Stolen Sisters

A photograph of women walking in the annual Women’s March in Feb. 14, 2015. (flickr/Jen Castro)

Over the past four decades, nearly 1,200 Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been murdered in Canada, according to a 2014 RCMP report. Some other estimates put that number at approximately 4,000.

The failure of various police departments around the Lower Mainland to investigate the epidemic enabled serial predators to target vulnerable women, in particular along the Highway of Tears and on Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES). For years, both law enforcement officials and the public at large turned a blind eye as dozens of women wound up dead or disappeared without a trace.

How Did This Happen?

For every person who knew one of these women, there is a story that will break your heart.

Read more at: http://runnermag.ca/2018/02/no-more-stolen-sisters/

How Cops Botch Serial Killer Investigations

Lorimer Shenher knows the grave consequences of underestimating the seriousness of a missing persons’ case.

Shenher, formerly the lead investigator of Vancouver police’s investigation into missing women from the Downtown Eastside, was given a tip about serial killer Robert Pickton in July 1998, after he’d stabbed and nearly killed a sex worker. The attempted murder charge against him was stayed. But Pickton wasn’t arrested until February 2002, when cops first obtained a warrant to search his pig farm for illegal guns. There, they found personal items belonging to some of the missing women. Between the stayed charge and the time of his arrest, police believe Pickton killed an additional 21 women, many of them sex workers.

“If they had been white UBC students, you would’ve seen the National Guard being called out,” Shenher told VICE.

Eventually, Pickton was convicted of the murders of six women, though he was charged with

Read more at: https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/bjy9ma/how-cops-botch-serial-killer-investigations

How Cops Botch Serial Killer Investigations – VICE

Lorimer Shenher knows the grave consequences of underestimating the seriousness of a missing persons’ case.

Shenher, formerly the lead investigator of Vancouver police’s investigation into missing women from the Downtown Eastside, was given a tip about serial killer Robert Pickton in July 1998, after he’d stabbed and nearly killed a sex worker. The attempted murder charge against him was stayed. But Pickton wasn’t arrested until February 2002, when cops first obtained a warrant to search his pig farm for illegal guns. There, they found personal items belonging to some of the missing women. Between the stayed charge and the time of his arrest, police believe Pickton killed an additional 21 women, many of them sex workers.

“If they had been white UBC students, you would’ve seen the National Guard being called out,” Shenher told VICE.

Eventually, Pickton was convicted of the murders of six women, though he was charged with

Read more at: https://www.vice.com/en_ca/article/bjy9ma/how-cops-botch-serial-killer-investigations

The Creepiest Unsolved Mysteries You Need to Know About

For every thriller movie or best-selling suspense novel, there’s a far more disturbing unsolved mystery that’s even creepier because it happened in real life.

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Murder, disappearances, fires, ghost ships … these are the stories that will haunt you long after you finish reading them, and will leave you wondering — what REALLY happened? And — even scarier — could it happen again?

1. The Dyatlov Pass incident

Dyatlov Pass disappearance A terrifying scene met investigators. | Russian Federation/Wikimedia Commons

It was February of 1959 when nine hikers enthusiastically set out for a camping trip in the mountains of Russia. The first evening, they made camp, had some dinner, and went to bed. What happened next is a mystery because none of the nine returned alive.

In late February, a rescue crew found their tent while searching

Read more at: https://www.cheatsheet.com/culture/the-creepiest-unsolved-mysteries-you-need-to-know-about.html/?a=viewall

Thousands of fallen feathers

Part 1 of 2

Last week, a 14-year-old Indigenous girl was reported missing in Kenora, a town about the size of Quesnel in northwestern Ontario, near the border with Manitoba.

Fortunately, she was found safe and unharmed on Saturday, according to the Chronicle Journal, the daily newspaper in Thunder Bay, 500 kilometres away.

Thunder Bay is the Prince George of northern Ontario. Although it has about 25,000 more people, it, like Prince George, is an isolated regional hub, a full day’s drive from a major urban centre, surrounded by lakes, rivers, trees and small mountains, with a large Indigenous population, both within the city and throughout the broader region.

Even more so than northern B.C., northern Ontario is dotted with tiny, isolated First Nations communities, many of them only accessible by air and/or logging roads during the summer.

Both Prince George and Thunder Bay have also suffered.

Prince George has had to endure the murder

Read more at: http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/opinion/editorial/thousands-of-fallen-feathers-1.23151765

Victim’s family still heartbroken after dead US sex offender linked to Highway of Tears slaying (with video)

In the summer of 1974, Colleen MacMillen, a pretty, strawberry-blond teenager, left her Lac La Hache home to hitchhike just a few kilometres to her friend’s house.

Even though hitchhiking was a common practice in the 1970s, Colleen never made it to her destination. Her body was found one month later beside a logging road south of 100 Mile House.

“Colleen was a lovely, sweet, innocent 16-year-old kid, and there are still no words in the world to express how terribly she was wronged,” her teary-eyed brother Shawn MacMillen told a packed RCMP news conference Tuesday.

Her heartbroken family was left without answers for 38 years. The RCMP revealed it now believes a U.S. convict, Bobby Jack Fowler, killed MacMillen.

Click here to see photos of women missing and murdered on Highway of Tears

The Oregon man, who died in prison in 2006 while serving a sentence for kidnapping, attempted rape and

Read more at: http://calgaryherald.com/News/Metro/video-rcmp-believe-there-is-more-than-one-highway-of-tears-killer/wcm/c9a8beb3-d51d-4d43-ae4f-30a451f89050

Bigger buses coming to meet the demand on Highway of Tears

B.C. Transit says it will be getting bigger buses to meet the demand for public transit along Highway 16 between Prince George and Burns Lake — a service that was added in response to the demand for safe transportation along Highway 16, a road known as “the Highway of Tears.”

The highway, so known because of a series of murders and disappearances of mainly Indigenous women along its 720 kilometres, runs between Prince George and Prince Rupert, B.C.

“We are pleased to see the ridership numbers,” said B.C. Transit spokesperson Jonathan Dyck. 

Since starting in June, Dyck said there has been consistent ridership on its routes between Prince George and Burns Lake, as well as between Burns Lake and Smithers.

Roger Joseph

Roger Joseph is using the new bus service, because his daughter felt it was too dangerous for him to

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bigger-buses-coming-to-meet-the-demand-on-highway-of-tears-1.4369509