Category Archives: Highway of Tears

Remembering Canada’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Two Indigenous KPU instructors and “Butterflies in Spirit” hosted an event to raise awareness on Sept. 26

(From left to right) Billie Jeanne, KPU professors Melinda Bige and Lisa Monchalin, and Maranda Johnson. Jeanne, Monchalin and Johnson are members of “Butterflies in Spirit”. (Ashley Hyshka)

In Canada, around 1,000 Indigenous women and girls have been reported by the RCMP as missing or murdered over the last four decades. Other statistics put that number as high as 4,000.

KPU instructors Lisa Monchalin and Melinda Bige drew attention to that issue with an on-campus event called “Raising Awareness of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls”, hosted by the Indigenous Activism and Introduction to Indigenous Studies courses that they teach.

Students created posters stating that “Indigenous women are loved and valued” in class before proceeding to the KPU

Read more at: http://runnermag.ca/2017/10/remembering-canadas-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women-and-girls/

‘We’re going to watch you’: Here’s what families say needs to happen as MMIWG inquiry wraps BC hearings

“We’re going to watch you.” 

That message was delivered to the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls by Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief Namoks (John Ridsdale) on the third and final day of community hearings in Smithers, B.C., on Thursday.

“We don’t want you to make a report, put it away and dust it off when it comes handy for you to use,” he said. 

“We’re not letting you off easy, because we were not let off easy.”

Chief commissioner Marion Buller summarized what the inquiry had heard about the personal impacts of the disproportionate rate of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

“We’ve heard of tremendous losses to generations of families,” she said.

“We have also heard of the

Read more at: https://ca.news.yahoo.com/apos-apos-going-watch-apos-055105744.html

‘We’re going to watch you’: Here’s what families say needs to …

“We’re going to watch you.” 

That message was delivered to the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls by Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief Namoks (John Ridsdale) on the third and final day of community hearings in Smithers, B.C., on Thursday.

MMIWG commissioners

MMIWG commissioners Michèle Audette and Marion Buller listen to a message from Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs.

“We don’t want you to make a report, put it away and dust it off when it comes handy for you to use,” he said. 

“We’re not letting you off easy, because we were not let off easy.”

‘You shine the light on the darkness of racism, sexism and indifference.’
– Marion Buller, chief commissioner

Chief commissioner Marion Buller summarized what the inquiry had heard about the personal impacts of the disproportionate rate of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

“We’ve heard of tremendous losses to

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mmiwg-inquiry-wrap-1.4312518

‘We’re going to watch you’: Here’s what families say needs to happen as MMIWG inquiry wraps BC hearings

“We’re going to watch you.” 

That message was delivered to the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls by Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief Namoks (John Ridsdale) on the third and final day of community hearings in Smithers, B.C., on Thursday.

MMIWG commissioners

MMIWG commissioners Michèle Audette and Marion Buller listen to a message from Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs.

“We don’t want you to make a report, put it away and dust it off when it comes handy for you to use,” he said. 

“We’re not letting you off easy, because we were not let off easy.”

‘You shine the light on the darkness of racism, sexism and indifference.’
– Marion Buller, chief commissioner

Chief commissioner Marion Buller summarized what the inquiry had heard about the personal impacts of the disproportionate rate of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

“We’ve heard of tremendous losses to

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mmiwg-inquiry-wrap-1.4312518

‘We’re going to watch you’: Here’s what families say needs to … – CBC

“We’re going to watch you.” 

That message was delivered to the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls by Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief Namoks (John Ridsdale) on the third and final day of community hearings in Smithers, B.C., on Thursday.

MMIWG commissioners

MMIWG commissioners Michèle Audette and Marion Buller listen to a message from Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs.

“We don’t want you to make a report, put it away and dust it off when it comes handy for you to use,” he said. 

“We’re not letting you off easy, because we were not let off easy.”

‘You shine the light on the darkness of racism, sexism and indifference.’
– Marion Buller, chief commissioner

Chief commissioner Marion Buller summarized what the inquiry had heard about the personal impacts of the disproportionate rate of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

“We’ve heard of tremendous losses to

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mmiwg-inquiry-wrap-1.4312518

Skepticism and hope as national MMIWG hearings come to BC’s Highway of Tears

Gladys Radek has spent a lot of time walking since her niece Tamara Chipman disappeared 12 years ago.

She’s marched across the country to speak in the House of Commons about her niece and other missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

She’s also walked the Highway of Tears, the stretch of Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert, B.C., where Chipman was last seen.

On Monday, Radek completed what she says will be her final walk: a 300-kilometre journey from Prince Rupert to Smithers where she will testify at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Gladys Radek

Gladys Radek holds a photo of her niece Tamara Chipman, who disappeared in 2005 along Highway 16 in northern B.C. The 700-kilometre stretch of highway between Prince George and Prince Rupert has been dubbed the Highway of Tears because of the number of women and

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mmiwg-hearings-smithers-1.4303888

Canada’s forgotten women

Sarah de Vries started running away when she was 13, in 1983. She lived in cheap apartments and grim hotels in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia – places that would let a teenager turn tricks. Later, she got hooked on heroin.

Sarah’s big sister, Maggie, remembers a bubbly, adorable baby. But life was not always easy. Of mixed race, with some black and aboriginal ancestry, Sarah was targeted by racist bullies, and sometimes felt disconnected from her white adoptive family.

In 1995, she wrote about how many women were missing from her neighborhood, Vancouver’s rough Downtown Eastside.

“Am I next? Is he watching me now?” she wrote in a journal her sister published years later, after Sarah, too, disappeared. “Stalking me like a predator and its prey. Waiting, waiting for some perfect spot, time or my stupid mistake.”

We know now that the Downtown Eastside was where serial

Read more at: https://www.iol.co.za/news/world/canadas-forgotten-women-1462907

Serial killer found guilty of professional misconduct by nursing college

TORONTO — The actions of a nurse who killed vulnerable patients in her care were the “most egregious” Ontario’s nursing regulator has ever seen, the body said Tuesday as it revoked Elizabeth Wettlaufer’s certification and found her guilty of professional misconduct.

But the College of Nurses of Ontario defended itself when asked if it could have done more to flag Wettlaufer as a concern, saying it had not found evidence of her intent to harm patients when it previously investigated two incidents involving her.

Wettlaufer was found guilty of 14 counts of professional misconduct after a hearing before a disciplinary panel that came nearly two months after she pleaded guilty to murdering eight seniors in her care.

The 50-year-old — who is currently serving a life sentence with no chance of parole for 25 years — was not present at the hearing.

“This is the most egregious and disgraceful conduct this panel has ever

Read more at: http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/serial-killer-found-guilty-of-professional-misconduct-by-nursing-college-1.3517601

5 Tragic Cold Cases That Never Got Solved

Crimes occur every day yet some incidents get national attention. Whether it be a case featuring a celebrity or a particularly gruesome crime, some cases make national—and international—headlines. Still, many of these cases go ultimately unsolved. Cold Justice investigates such cold cases and premieres on Oxygen on July 22nd at 8/7c. Here are 5 tragic cold cases that were never solved.

 

Keddie Cabin Murders

A quaint family getaway turned into murder in 1981. Glenna “Sue” Sharp and her five children were staying in a cabin in Keddie, California. On April 11, 14-year-old Sheila came home to find her mother, brother and a family friend murdered.  All three victims at the crime scene had been bound with medical and electrical tape. Sue and Johnny had been stabbed and Sue had also been bludgeoned with a rifle. Wingate had been strangled and bludgeoned with some other object. Two young

Read more at: http://www.oxygen.com/cold-justice/blogs/5-tragic-cold-cases-that-never-got-solved

Long-awaited bus service along BC ‘Highway of Tears’ prepares for launch

Mary Teegee has spent over two decades wondering how things could have ended up differently for her cousin if she’d had access to safe transit.

In 1994, Ramona Wilson went missing while hitchhiking near the central B.C. town of Smithers. Ten months later, her body was found, adding her name to the list of 18 women since 1969 who have been killed or went missing along that same stretch of Highway 16 from Prince Rupert to Prince George — commonly referred to as the “Highway of Tears.”

To this day, Wilson’s family is far from solving her murder, but Teegee says they’re not the only ones left with a lack of closure.

“We’d definitely still like to find out what happened,” she says, “but we can’t forget the other families where they haven’t found the remains of their loved ones. There’s still a threat out there, and we can’t forget that.”

A

Read more at: http://globalnews.ca/news/3537644/long-awaited-bus-service-along-b-c-highway-of-tears-prepares-for-launch/