Category Archives: Highway Serial Killings Initiative

Remembering Canada’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Two Indigenous KPU instructors and “Butterflies in Spirit” hosted an event to raise awareness on Sept. 26

(From left to right) Billie Jeanne, KPU professors Melinda Bige and Lisa Monchalin, and Maranda Johnson. Jeanne, Monchalin and Johnson are members of “Butterflies in Spirit”. (Ashley Hyshka)

In Canada, around 1,000 Indigenous women and girls have been reported by the RCMP as missing or murdered over the last four decades. Other statistics put that number as high as 4,000.

KPU instructors Lisa Monchalin and Melinda Bige drew attention to that issue with an on-campus event called “Raising Awareness of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls”, hosted by the Indigenous Activism and Introduction to Indigenous Studies courses that they teach.

Students created posters stating that “Indigenous women are loved and valued” in class before proceeding to the KPU

Read more at: http://runnermag.ca/2017/10/remembering-canadas-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women-and-girls/

‘We’re going to watch you’: Here’s what families say needs to happen as MMIWG inquiry wraps BC hearings

“We’re going to watch you.” 

That message was delivered to the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls by Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief Namoks (John Ridsdale) on the third and final day of community hearings in Smithers, B.C., on Thursday.

“We don’t want you to make a report, put it away and dust it off when it comes handy for you to use,” he said. 

“We’re not letting you off easy, because we were not let off easy.”

Chief commissioner Marion Buller summarized what the inquiry had heard about the personal impacts of the disproportionate rate of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

“We’ve heard of tremendous losses to generations of families,” she said.

“We have also heard of the

Read more at: https://ca.news.yahoo.com/apos-apos-going-watch-apos-055105744.html

‘We’re going to watch you’: Here’s what families say needs to happen as MMIWG inquiry wraps BC hearings

“We’re going to watch you.” 

That message was delivered to the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls by Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief Namoks (John Ridsdale) on the third and final day of community hearings in Smithers, B.C., on Thursday.

MMIWG commissioners

MMIWG commissioners Michèle Audette and Marion Buller listen to a message from Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs.

“We don’t want you to make a report, put it away and dust it off when it comes handy for you to use,” he said. 

“We’re not letting you off easy, because we were not let off easy.”

‘You shine the light on the darkness of racism, sexism and indifference.’
– Marion Buller, chief commissioner

Chief commissioner Marion Buller summarized what the inquiry had heard about the personal impacts of the disproportionate rate of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

“We’ve heard of tremendous losses to

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mmiwg-inquiry-wrap-1.4312518

‘We’re going to watch you’: Here’s what families say needs to … – CBC

“We’re going to watch you.” 

That message was delivered to the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls by Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief Namoks (John Ridsdale) on the third and final day of community hearings in Smithers, B.C., on Thursday.

MMIWG commissioners

MMIWG commissioners Michèle Audette and Marion Buller listen to a message from Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs.

“We don’t want you to make a report, put it away and dust it off when it comes handy for you to use,” he said. 

“We’re not letting you off easy, because we were not let off easy.”

‘You shine the light on the darkness of racism, sexism and indifference.’
– Marion Buller, chief commissioner

Chief commissioner Marion Buller summarized what the inquiry had heard about the personal impacts of the disproportionate rate of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

“We’ve heard of tremendous losses to

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mmiwg-inquiry-wrap-1.4312518

‘We’re going to watch you’: Here’s what families say needs to …

“We’re going to watch you.” 

That message was delivered to the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls by Wet’suwet’en hereditary chief Namoks (John Ridsdale) on the third and final day of community hearings in Smithers, B.C., on Thursday.

MMIWG commissioners

MMIWG commissioners Michèle Audette and Marion Buller listen to a message from Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs.

“We don’t want you to make a report, put it away and dust it off when it comes handy for you to use,” he said. 

“We’re not letting you off easy, because we were not let off easy.”

‘You shine the light on the darkness of racism, sexism and indifference.’
– Marion Buller, chief commissioner

Chief commissioner Marion Buller summarized what the inquiry had heard about the personal impacts of the disproportionate rate of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

“We’ve heard of tremendous losses to

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mmiwg-inquiry-wrap-1.4312518

Skepticism and hope as national MMIWG hearings come to BC’s Highway of Tears

Gladys Radek has spent a lot of time walking since her niece Tamara Chipman disappeared 12 years ago.

She’s marched across the country to speak in the House of Commons about her niece and other missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

She’s also walked the Highway of Tears, the stretch of Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert, B.C., where Chipman was last seen.

On Monday, Radek completed what she says will be her final walk: a 300-kilometre journey from Prince Rupert to Smithers where she will testify at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Gladys Radek

Gladys Radek holds a photo of her niece Tamara Chipman, who disappeared in 2005 along Highway 16 in northern B.C. The 700-kilometre stretch of highway between Prince George and Prince Rupert has been dubbed the Highway of Tears because of the number of women and

Read more at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mmiwg-hearings-smithers-1.4303888

Canada’s forgotten women

Sarah de Vries started running away when she was 13, in 1983. She lived in cheap apartments and grim hotels in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia – places that would let a teenager turn tricks. Later, she got hooked on heroin.

Sarah’s big sister, Maggie, remembers a bubbly, adorable baby. But life was not always easy. Of mixed race, with some black and aboriginal ancestry, Sarah was targeted by racist bullies, and sometimes felt disconnected from her white adoptive family.

In 1995, she wrote about how many women were missing from her neighborhood, Vancouver’s rough Downtown Eastside.

“Am I next? Is he watching me now?” she wrote in a journal her sister published years later, after Sarah, too, disappeared. “Stalking me like a predator and its prey. Waiting, waiting for some perfect spot, time or my stupid mistake.”

We know now that the Downtown Eastside was where serial

Read more at: https://www.iol.co.za/news/world/canadas-forgotten-women-1462907

Former ST reporter’s book explores highway killings, the families and why case wasn’t solved

NEW BEDFORD — She’d tried writing about the killings.

The unsolved murders of 9 women and the disappearance of two others haunted her. One by one their bodies were discarded along the highways in Greater New Bedford. As a reporter for The Standard-Times in the 1980s, Maureen Boyle was there every step of the way.

She knew the cops, the prosecutors, the families.

She tried writing their stories in 2000-2001, but passages would not come together and she put it aside.

Then, long after she turned in her reporter’s notebooks for a teacher’s desk, Holly Cardoza sat in one of Boyle’s journalism classes at Stonehill College. Neither woman knew about the connection they shared.

Something that Boyle had said about the killings struck a nerve with Cardoza. Holly’s aunt, Marilyn Cardoza Roberts, was one of the victims who remained missing. Holly Cardoza, now a

Read more at: http://www.southcoasttoday.com/news/20170902/former-s-t-reporters-book-explores-highway-killings-families-and-why-case-wasnt-solved

Gov. Baker bill would reset state policy on immigration detainers

BOSTON — Gov. Charlie Baker asked Massachusetts lawmakers on Tuesday to grant state and local police officers authority to cooperate with federal immigration officials by holding people considered dangerous or who have committed violent crimes.

The bill was filed Tuesday in response to a decision issued last week by the state’s highest court that is considered the first of its kind in the nation by the American Civil Liberties Union. The justices ruled that current Massachusetts law does not allow police and other law enforcement officers to hold individuals solely on the basis of a federal immigration detainer request.

The proposal would not authorize police to enforce federal immigration law, the Republican governor said, but would instead address a “statutory gap” identified in the Supreme Judicial Court’s ruling and reinstate policies that had previously been followed in Massachusetts.

“I have long believed and

Read more at: http://www.southcoasttoday.com/news/20170801/gov-baker-bill-would-reset-state-policy-on-immigration-detainers

Bristol County CAC celebrates 10 years as their need grows

FALL RIVER — The Children’s Advocacy Center of Bristol County deals with the smallest victims, and on Monday, they set up a tent near their Arch Street headquarters, and celebrated 10 years of doing good work.

“Opening a nonprofit during an economic downturn is material for a book,” said CAC Executive Director Michelle Loranger.

Loranger noted that the CAC has seen a 123 percent increase in cases since it opened in 2007.

The agency helps children who have been abused or have witnessed violence.

In particular, the agency provided interview rooms where children who have a story to tell can tell it once, instead of having to tell the same terrible story to police, district attorneys and other interviews.

A number of police officials, elected officials, supporters and workers attended Monday’s event.

“I wouldn’t be here without you giving your time, treasure and talent,”

Read more at: http://www.southcoasttoday.com/news/20170731/bristol-county-cac-celebrates-10-years-as-their-need-grows