Monthly Archives: May 2016

In Tuckerton: Boulevard of bird watching

Wilson’s phalarope

WHAT WE’VE SPOTTED

* Great shearwater, Avalon

* Sooty shearwater, Manasquan Inlet

* Common gallinule, Sandy Hook

* Curlew sandpiper, Heislerville Wildlife Management Area

* Wilson’s phalarope, Cape May


NOW THAT
Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (which birders affectionately call “Brig”) has closed Wildlife Drive for dike repairs on weekdays — with it only partially open on weekends into August — birders will be seeking another place to view some of their favorite feathered creatures.

What they want is a spot from which shorebirds, terns, herons, egrets and raptors can be seen right from their vehicles … and such a place does exist! While it may not be quite as fabulous as the refuge, Great Bay Boulevard in Tuckerton should more than suffice.

The road, immediately south of the Tuckerton Seaport on Route 9, runs south for about 6 miles before

Read more at: http://www.nj.com/inside-jersey/index.ssf/2016/05/in_tuckerton_boulevard_of_bird_watching.html

"48 Hours" explores the mysteries and murders along Canada’s …

Produced by Paul LaRosa, Clare Friedland and Alec Sirken

[This story previously aired on Dec. 21, 2013. It was updated on May 28, 2016.]


“The road’s called Highway 16. It’s part of the Trans-Canada Highway system. … There are places in this road where you will see more bears than you will see cars. The road can take on kind of a sinister aspect to it. It’s a place that can be a good friend to evil. The locals know it as the Highway of Tears. And it’s called that because there’s been a — a series of disappearances and murders of women and girls that date back four decades, and a large number of them are still unsolved,” said Bob Friel, an investigative journalist who has traveled this notorious road in British Columbia, Canada. “People know that their sisters and daughters are at risk if they go near this highway

Read more at: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/48-hours-explores-the-mysteries-and-murders-along-canadian-highway-of-tears/

Highway of Tears

Produced by Paul LaRosa, Clare Friedland and Alec Sirken

[This story previously aired on Dec. 21, 2013. It was updated on May 28, 2016.]


“The road’s called Highway 16. It’s part of the Trans-Canada Highway system. … There are places in this road where you will see more bears than you will see cars. The road can take on kind of a sinister aspect to it. It’s a place that can be a good friend to evil. The locals know it as the Highway of Tears. And it’s called that because there’s been a — a series of disappearances and murders of women and girls that date back four decades, and a large number of them are still unsolved,” said Bob Friel, an investigative journalist who has traveled this notorious road in British Columbia, Canada. “People know that their sisters and daughters are at risk if they go near this highway and

Read more at: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/48-hours-explores-the-mysteries-and-murders-along-canadian-highway-of-tears/

Mystery of missing, murdered women along "Highway of Tears"

Paul LaRosa is a “48 Hours” producer. He investigated the cases of missing and murdered women along a Canadian highway for the episode, “Highway of Tears.” The episode airs Saturday on CBS as part of a double feature, starting at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

The “Highway of Tears” sounds like something out of a Stephen King thriller — a long stretch of road in an isolated, beautiful Canadian countryside where at least 18 and possibly many more girls and women have been murdered or gone missing since 1969.

Aboriginal families search for justice on Canada’s Highway of Tears …

Less than a year after her 15-year-old cousin vanished, Delphine Nikal, 16, was last seen hitchhiking from this isolated northern Canadian town on a spring morning in 1990.

Ramona Wilson, 16, a member of her high school baseball team, left home one Saturday night in June 1994 to attend a dance a few towns away. She never arrived. Her remains were found 10 months later near the local airport.

Tamara Chipman, 22, disappeared in 2005, leaving behind a toddler. “She’s still missing,” Gladys Radek, her aunt, said. “It’ll be 11 years in September.”

Dozens of Canadian women and girls, most of them indigenous, have disappeared or been murdered near Highway 16, a remote ribbon of asphalt that bisects British Columbia and snakes past thick forests, logging towns and impoverished Indian reserves on its way to the Pacific Ocean. So many women and girls have vanished or turned up dead along one stretch

Read more at: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/state/article79646527.html

Aboriginal families search for justice on Canada’s Highway of Tears

Less than a year after her 15-year-old cousin vanished, Delphine Nikal, 16, was last seen hitchhiking from this isolated northern Canadian town on a spring morning in 1990.

Ramona Wilson, 16, a member of her high school baseball team, left home one Saturday night in June 1994 to attend a dance a few towns away. She never arrived. Her remains were found 10 months later near the local airport.

Tamara Chipman, 22, disappeared in 2005, leaving behind a toddler. “She’s still missing,” Gladys Radek, her aunt, said. “It’ll be 11 years in September.”

Dozens of Canadian women and girls, most of them indigenous, have disappeared or been murdered near Highway 16, a remote ribbon of asphalt that bisects British Columbia and snakes past thick forests, logging towns and impoverished Indian reserves on its way to the Pacific Ocean. So many women and girls have vanished or turned up dead along one stretch

Read more at: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/state/article79646527.html

Truckers make ideal serial killers: FBI

If you want to be a serial killer, then being a long-haul trucker is an excellent career choice, according to the FBI.

In a recent blog post and accompanying video about the Highway Serial Killings (HSK) initiative, the nation’s top law enforcement agency noted: “If there is such a thing as an ideal profession for a serial killer, it may well be as a long-haul truck driver.”

FBI Crime Analyst Christie Palazzolo, who was quoted in the blog and appeared in the video, added that truck driving is an honorable profession and the overwhelming majority of drivers are not murderers. “But it does happen, and the pattern is unmistakable,” she said.

The Highway Serial Killings initiative dates to 2004 when an analyst from the Oklahoma Bureau of Investigation saw a pattern of murdered women’s bodies being dumped along I-40 in Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, and Mississippi. The cases were referred to

Read more at: http://fleetowner.com/driver-management-resource-center/truckers-make-ideal-serial-killers-fbi

‘We survived’: Acushnet Heights tackling challenges head on

NEW BEDFORD — At Giammalvo’s Market, a humble Purchase Street deli that’s been in business for more than 100 years, the rich and the poor, those who live across the street and those who’ve moved away, all line up for their cuts of meat, old-fashioned style. 

Giammalvo’s is a gathering spot for a neighborhood long known as Weld Square, but in an effort to re-imagine its gritty reputation 15 years ago, was renamed Acushnet Heights. Like much of Acushnet Heights, Giammalvo’s has a homey quality to it but a by-gone feeling too. 

The food is cut fresh at the deli, not pre-packaged, and the bulky roll sandwiches sell for as little as a buck, appropriate for a neighborhood that is among the poorest of the poor in the city.  

The market — one of the few storefronts whose doors are still open, is a community

Read more at: http://www.southcoasttoday.com/article/20160521/NEWS/160529844