Monthly Archives: January 2016

Seven years later, one detective remains on West Mesa killings

Two investigators stand on a massive pile of earth that was excavated in the search for human remains at a 100-acre site near 118th and Dennis Chavez SW in February 2009. (Pat Vasquez-Cunningham/Albuquerque Journal)

Two investigators stand on a massive pile of earth that was excavated in the search for human remains at a 100-acre site near 118th and Dennis Chavez SW in February 2009. (Pat Vasquez-Cunningham/Albuquerque Journal)

Copyright © 2016 Albuquerque Journal

Seven years ago Tuesday, police began throwing everything they had at the biggest crime the city had ever seen – the murders of 11 women found buried on the city’s West Mesa.

The pace was frantic. There were human remains to identify and a serial killer

Read more at: https://www.abqjournal.com/715705/west-mesa-murders-seven-years-later.html

West Mesa Murders

The Victims


West mesa murder victims

In mid-2005, Albuquerque police detective Ida Lopez noticed that women with ties to drugs and prostitution had been vanishing from Albuquerque.

She started a list.

Ten of the missing women — Monica Candelaria, Cinnamon Elks, Veronica Romero, Victoria Chavez, Michelle Valdez, Virginia Cloven, Julie Nieto, Evelyn Salazar, Jamie Barela and Doreen Marquez — were found buried on the mesa in 2009, along with Syllannia Edwards, who hadn’t been reported missing in Albuquerque.

It would take police nearly a year to identify all the remains. As they did so, they dug into the victims’ pasts in the hopes they could find the killer.

Families of the missing women in Albuquerque seemed to already know their daughters, mothers, sisters were buried and began leaving memorials before all the women were even identified.

Their families remember the happier sides of them — many knew each other, had

Read more at: https://www.abqjournal.com/community-data/west-mesa-murders

Remembering Glenn Frey: Cameron Crowe on Eagles’ Teen King

It was 1972, and “Take It Easy” was on the charts. The Eagles came to San Diego, where I was working for a local underground paper. I grabbed my photographer buddy Gary from school and made a plan. We were going to sneak backstage and grab an interview with this new group. I loved their harmonies, and the confident style that charged their first hit.

Glenn Frey introduced the band: “We’re the Eagles, from southern California.” They were explosive, right off the top, opening with their a cappella rendition of “Seven Bridges Road.” Then, this new

Read more at: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/remembering-glenn-frey-cameron-crowe-on-eagles-teen-king-20160121