Monthly Archives: July 2008

Solving a cold case: A look inside a detective’s bag of tools

NEW BEDFORD — When it comes to solving a cold murder case, DNA may be the new kid on the block and all the rage, but investigators say there is no substitute for dogged, painstaking detective work.

NEW BEDFORD — When it comes to solving a cold murder case, DNA may be the new kid on the block and all the rage, but investigators say there is no substitute for dogged, painstaking detective work.

“You can’t solve a cold case without good detective and good police work,” said Patrick Bomberg, a prosecutor in Bristol County District Attorney C. Samuel Sutter’s office.

“Nothing will fall from that tree unless you shake it,” said Richard Ferreira, a retired New Bedford police detective, underscoring the importance of re-interviewing witnesses, reviewing old case files and talking with friends and associates of suspects.

“It’s common sense,” he said. “If I don’t ask, no one

Read more at: http://www.southcoasttoday.com/article/20080707/NEWS/807070346

Dark days revisited

Today, two decades later, it stands as Bristol County’s most publicized, unsolved crime of the 20th century: Nine dead women found alongside local roads between July 1988 and April 1989.

On the eve of Independence Day in 1988, a motorist made a grisly discovery when she pulled off the road to pick flowers: the skeletal remains of a woman about 50 feet from the highway in a wooded clearing on the northbound side of Route 140 in Freetown near the Lakeville line.

The discovery of the woman’s body — she turned out to be Debra Medeiros, 29, of Fall River — and the bodies of the eight other women who would be found alongside local roads between July 1988 and April 1989 became known as the highway killings.

Today, two decades later, it stands as Bristol County’s most publicized, unsolved crime of the 20th century. Three of the investigators who worked

Read more at: http://www.southcoasttoday.com/article/20080707/NEWS/807070337